Podcast Recommendation: Manga Sensei

Today’s podcast recommendation is the Manga Sensei podcast, a podcast that offers great Japanese lessons in just 5 minutes each episode!

The podcast is hosted by John (Manga Sensei) who is our helpful guide to the Japanese language. Most of the Manga Sensei episodes are language-focused, where each episode covers a different grammar point.

Grammar point focused episodes will provide an explanation of the grammar point – for example, how to conjugate it and when it used, alongside a few examples.

Outside of grammar study, the Manga Sensei podcast also has interviews with people who regularly use Japanese, normally people who live in Japan and/or write about the Japanese language. There are also episodes that focus on helpful language learning tips for Japanese (or any language) such as bridging the gap between intermediate and advanced (episode from May 14, 2018).

 

Why I like the Manga Sensei podcast

One of the best things about the podcast is how much John sensei manages to cover in a relatively short period of time. Somehow in just five-minute episodes, he has been able to fit in some interesting insight on how grammar points are used, without it feeling too overwhelming. Not only that but with over 250 episodes, there is plenty of content to listen to – new episodes are also uploaded on a daily basis! The type of Japanese covered in the grammar episodes includes more informal speech and is generally more natural than what you might get from a textbook.

In addition, in every episode, John comes across as an enthusiastic teacher who really wants everyone to do the very best with Japanese study. The Manga Sensei ethos is all about knowing you’ll make mistakes and doing it anyway, which I think is the best way to approach languages.

The episodes have not been produced in order of grammar difficulty so you may find yourself searching around for a little while if there is a particular grammar point you are stuck on (if you are a beginner to intermediate Japanese learner, he has most likely covered the grammar point in an episode already!).

 

Who I recommend the podcast for

I think that this podcast is good for anyone studying Japanese, as the grammar points covered range from the basics up to more sophisticated aspects of the language.

I always like to hear about the same grammar points explained in different ways (as I think it helps to really deepen your understanding of how certain aspects of the language work), and so I think the podcast is a nice compliment to someone who is taking classes or self-studying using a textbook. I also find that the interview episodes are really fun and perfect for when I need some study motivation!

You can find the episodes on the Manga Sensei website, or via any podcasting app (just search for “Manga Sensei”. There’s also a Youtube channel with a handful of videos too.

I definitely suggest checking out The Manga Sensei site. Every week there are short manga posted on the website that are designed to help you learn Japanese.

I’d probably recommend these short manga to upper beginners as there is no furigana on the manga itself, although each panel comes with a vocabulary list and helpful notes on the language used.

If you are intending to read manga in Japanese at some point, these notes are pretty useful – you’ll note that the language used is closer to how Japanese is spoken rather than what you might learn in a formal setting.

Aside from that, the website’s blog has a number of posts on the Japanese language (expanding upon a lot of the topics covered in the grammar episodes) and culture, which is all very useful for learners.

Have you tried this podcast? What did you think? Let me know in the comments!

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Cultural Kotoba: Tanabata

cultural_kotoba_tanabata

Tanabata is just around the corner (in some parts of Japan anyway), and it might be one of my favourite celebrations in Japan.

Tanabata is not a national holiday, but it is widely celebrated around the country. To me, this festival is truly a sign that summer has arrived. I just love the colourful celebrations at Tanabata, so decided to write a bit about it today.

Where does Tanabata originate from?

One of the things I was curious about is why Tanabata is written in Japanese as 七夕. 七 is normally read as しち・なな (shichi/nana) and 夕 is normally read as ゆう (yuu), so where did the name Tanabata come from?

Actually, what we now know as Tanabata was a festival called Qixi originating in China and was brought to Japan in the 8th century. Tanabata is thought to originally refer to a special cloth (棚機・たなばた) offered to a god to pray for a good harvest of rice crops in a separate ritual. The timing of this offering coincided with Qixi, and so the two festivals merged. Once merged, the festival was still called tanabata but the kanji used was written as (七夕; meaning “evening of the seventh”) referring to the timing of the festival, which at one point was read as しちせき (shichiseki).

The timing of Tanabata is based on the traditional Japanese calendar; it is usually celebrated on the 7th night on the 7th month (ie. 7th July in the Gregorian calendar). However it can be celebrated during early August; during Japan’s transition from the Chinese lunar calendar to the current Gregorian calendar, the definition of the first month can vary by over 4 weeks and so August is sometimes treated as the 7th month in the calendar.

The Story of Tanabata

The Tanabata story is based on the Chinese folk tale “The Cowherd and the Weaver Girl”. Here is my rough summary of the story:

Orihime ((織姫・おりひめ), literally “weaving princess”) lives by the Milky Way and works everyday weaving fabric. Because of her work, she doesn’t really have time to meet anyone and so her father, the Sky King(also known as Tentei/ 天帝・てんてい), arranges for her to meet Hikoboshi ((彦星・ひこぼし), the cow herder) who works on the other side of the Milky Way. They fall in love immediately and get married, but they also begin to neglect their work duties.

The Sky King is angry about this and takes his daughter back to the other side of the Milky Way as punishment. Orihime is extremely upset and pleads with her father to let her see Hikoboshi. The Sky King then agrees that they can meet on the 7th day of the 7th month every year as long as Orihime works hard.

If you want to try reading the story in simple Japanese, you can find it on the children’s story website Hukumusume here.

The celebration is therefore of the one night in the year when husband and wife are allowed to meet. Having said that, it is thought that the star-crossed lovers can only meet if the weather is clear on July 7th!

How is Tanabata celebrated?

Laika_ac_Tanabata_Wishes_(7472067930)

By Laika ac from USA (Tanabata Wishes) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons)

It is customary to write wishes on small strips of paper known as tanzaku (短冊・たんざく) which are then hung on bamboo along with other colourful decorations. Bamboo is culturally significant because it is a strong and durable plant and therefore symbolises prosperity.

Other decorations include:

  • Paper cranes known as 折鶴 (おりづる・oridzuru) which represent longevity
  • 吹き流し (ふきながし・fukinagashi) – these are streamers meant to represent the threads that Orihime weaves.
  • 網飾り(あみかざり・amikazari) – decorations that represent fishing nets. These are used to wish for an abundance of fish.
  • Purse or pouch shaped origami to wish for good luck with money

The city of Sendai in Miyagi prefecture is well known for its Tanabata celebrations, and lots of tourists flock there to enjoy the event. It is customary in Sendai to eat 素麺 (そうめん・soumen), a type of noodles usually served cold with a dipping sauce which makes it a refreshing meal in the summertime.

If you want to test your understanding of Tanabata in Japanese, JapanesePod101 have done a great video outlining Tanabata and its customs (recommended for intermediate learners and up!).

What is your favourite national holiday or festival (in Japan, or another country)? Please leave me a comment!

Using children’s stories to study Japanese

Finding material in Japanese that is just right for you as a beginner to the language can be pretty tough. Fortunately, children’s stories are a good place to start learning from in any language and Japanese is no different.

 

Why children’s stories?

Children’s stories are normally recommended for beginner language learners because:

  • The vocabulary and grammar used are limited and therefore simple.
  • Stories are designed to be fun and engaging without being too difficult to follow.
  • There are plenty of pictures to assist with the understanding of the story.
  • Sentences to be repetitive, which helps learners to identify common sentence structures.
  • They are short and therefore relatively quick to read.

On the other hand, there can be some unexpected difficulty with children’s stories. A lot of books for children have fantastical elements and are often not as straightforward as they seem. With Japanese, a lot of the children’s stories I have tried reading had lots of onomatopoeia, which is something rarely covered in beginner’s Japanese classes in my experience.

In addition, having sentences entirely in hiragana might look easier to tackle, but actually parsing the sentence can be tricky. Beginner’s Japanese textbooks are likely to put spaces in between hiragana words to avoid this issue but Japanese children’s books beyond those aimed at younger children will not have spaces.

Despite the potential difficulty, I still recommend children’s stories as the best way to get reading in Japanese. Children’s stories are widely available online for free, and there is bound to be a story that you enjoy.

 

Should I study Japanese stories or stories from other parts of the world?

In my opinion, the answer to this question is to study both!

It is easier to start off learning stories that you are already familiar with, as you will be able to fill in any gaps in your language knowledge from context. Japanese versions of popular children’s stories such as The Hare and the Tortoise (Japanese title: ), Little Red Riding Hood (Japanese title: 赤ずきん) and Cinderella (Japanese title: シンデレラ) available to read through the resources listed further on in this post.

On the other hand, some of the most popular Japanese children’s stories include:

かぐやひめ/ kaguyahime – Princess Kaguya

いっすんぼうし/ issunboushi – The One Inch Samurai

ももたろう/ momotarou – Peach Boy Momotaro

Without prior knowledge of the stories, these will be harder to follow for Japanese learners. I recommend trying to read these stories (in Japanese or otherwise) if you can in any case, since they provide an interesting insight into Japanese history and folklore and are often referenced in TV shows and other media.

I’ve put together a list of some of the best (mostly online) resources Japanese learners can use to get hold of children’s stories below.

 

Listening resources for Japanese children’s stories

  • YouTube

There’s a huge amount of Japanese children’s stories on Youtube. Searching terms related to children’s stories such as:

童話 どうわ/ Douwa – children’s stories

絵本 えほん/ Ehon – picture books

昔話 むかしばなし/ Mukashibanashi – folktales

おとぎ話 おとぎばなし/ Otogibanashi – fairytales

…will bring up children’s picture books and stories in Japanese.

One of my favourite youtube channels for Japanese children’s stories is called キッズボンボンTV (Kizzu Bon Bon TV), which has many many videos covering popular stories with Japanese subtitles. There are no English subtitles but there are English versions available for most stories and relevant links are always in the description box.

There’s also a channel called Japanese Fairy Tales, which has Japanese audio and English subtitles on its selection of stories.

  • Beelinguapp

Beelinguapp is an audiobook app that has lots of traditional children’s stories from around the world in many languages including Japanese. The app highlights the sentence being read, which makes it easy to follow the audio.

I wouldn’t consider it to be the best resource for intensively reading children’s stories in Japanese, but I do think that as an audiobook app it works pretty well. I’ve written a separate post reviewing this app if you are interested in learning more about how Beelinguapp works.

  • Audiobooks

Most children’s stories are available in the public domain, which means there are audiobooks available for free. Librivox is a website where you can get free audiobooks in many languages as well as Japanese. These audiobooks tend to be stories for which you can find the texts on Aozora Bunko.

Google Play has recently added a small selection of Japanese audiobooks for children to its catalogue. Examples of the audiobooks I have found include a series called いっしょに楽しむ にほんむかしばなし (issho ni tanoshimu nihon mukashibanashi), a series called エルマーのぼうけん (erumaa no bouken) and あなうさピータ (anausa piita – ie. The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter in Japanese).

I haven’t been able to try any of these out for myself yet, but listening to the free samples they appear to be of pretty good quality. Costs range between £4 and £8 per audiobook.

 

Reading Resources for Japanese children’s stories

You can buy physical Japanese books from a variety of online stores, most of which I have outlined in my Tadoku post. The below list is focused on places to read Japanese stories online.

Screenshot 2018-06-03 at 17.14.27

Tom has translated some of the most famous Japanese children’s stories as part of his own Japanese studies and shared them on his website for other Japanese learners to make use of. I recommend this site as it gives the furigana for any kanji used, has a vocabulary list for key phrases and breaks down the translation of each sentence.

Screenshot 2018-06-03 at 17.16.35

Hukumusume is a Japanese website full of children’s stories from Japan and around the world. I’ve written about this website in my Japanese Reading Resources for beginners (Part 2) post.

There aren’t any English translations, so it is a good idea to start off with a story you are already familiar with. I recommend reading Hukumusume stories through the wonderful TangoRisto app, which makes looking up unknown words a breeze.

Aozora is a well known free resource that has a huge catalogue of children’s stories in Japanese. In order to find them on the website you need to click on 分野別リスト on the main page and then look for ”童話書” (children’s stories). From this page you can select ”9 文学” to find the list of children’s literature, split by country of origin.

If you are looking for Japanese versions of a story you are familiar with, it is best to search for it in Wikipedia and then switch the page language to Japanese in order to find the Japanese title.

Obviously, there are many more Japanese stories that international ones on this website. I have written before about children’s stories by famous Japanese authors such as Niimi Nankichi, Ogawa Mimei and Yumeno Kyusaku which are particularly great choices for Japanese learners to use.

  • Amazon Kindle Store

I’ve singled out the Amazon Kindle store in this particular post as I have found the Amazon Kindle store in my country (the UK) has a collection of children’s books in Japanese, which can be purchased and read without any need to sign up to an Amazon JP account.

From the Kindle Store homepage in Amazon, go to ebooks in foreign languages section and select Japanese.

Screenshot 2018-06-03 at 17.20.10Screenshot 2018-06-03 at 17.19.34

Screenshot 2018-06-03 at 17.26.45

The Amazon UK store also has a children’s book section, making things even easier! Not all of the results tend to be 100% relevant so make sure to take advantage of any reviews you can find. Most books are £1-£3 each so are pretty cheap; take advantage of reading a sample so that you can assess the quality of the ebook before making any purchases.

  • Graded readers

Graded readers aimed at Japanese schoolchildren are available which tend to cover popular stories, but may also be focused on non-fiction topics. These books are normally divided into difficulty according to elementary school years and come with furigana readings for any kanji used.

Popular series include 10分で読めるお話 (juppun de yomeru ohanashi) for fiction and なぜ?どうして?(naze? doushite?) which covers non-fiction topics.

20180527_114308

I have the 2年生 version of 10分で読めるお話 as pictured above, which is a mixture of Japanese stories, non-Japanese stories and even a couple of poems. In addition to furigana, there are spaces between words and pictures every few pages to make the stories more manageable. This makes them good choices for those studying Japanese, even if it might take you a bit longer than 10 minutes to finish!

I would start with the 1年生 (ichi nensei) stories aimed at Japanese children in their first year of elementary school and work your way from there if that is too easy for you. These books are available in both ebook and physical book format from places like Amazon and eBookJapan.

PIBO is an app for children’s picture books in Japanese. PIBO touts itself as an ‘all you can read’ app for picture books. The app is entirely in Japanese but is super easy to use, even if you do not know much Japanese yet.

From the main page of the app, you get a choice of a selection of children’s books which change on a daily basis. The free version of the app gives you access to read up to 3 of these books per day. The books range from children’s classics to contemporary stories.

The app promises high-quality picture books and this is certainly the case – colours are vivid and bright, even on my mobile phone (it would be much better to read on a tablet of course). The stories are mostly aimed at children between the ages of 3 and 6; all of the stories I have read were entirely in hiragana with spaces between words. The great thing about PIBO is that all stories come with the option to listen to the audio which is also high quality and great for Japanese study.

Screenshot_20180529-223440Screenshot_20180529-223310

 

The app is free to download from the Apple App Store or Google Play Store. A full subscription costs £3.89 a month, which gives you access to the full library of 300+ books but I think the free subscription is sufficient for those learning Japanese.

Moving on to more advanced stories

Once you’ve become comfortable with reading books aimed at younger children, consider looking into books aimed at older children and young adults. Series of books aimed at older elementary age children include 角川つばさ文庫 (kadokawa tsubasa bunko) – these usually come with furigana over kanji used and are intended to be less linguistically complex. A wide range of books are published under this label and include adapted versions of classic Japanese literature, as well as adaptations of foreign books/ films in addition to original stories.

When tackling longer texts for the first time, consider reading translations of stories you are already familiar with to avoid getting overwhelmed with too much information. For example, the whole of the Harry Potter book series is available on the UK Amazon Kindle Store in Japanese.

There are also books aimed at Japanese children which can be appropriate for Japanese learners. 魔女の宅急便 (majo no takkyuubin – also known as Kiki’s Delivery Service) by Eiko Kadono is a popular children’s book that is fairly easy to follow, even more so if you are familiar with the Studio Ghibli film adaptation.

Other Japanese authors that I know of that write children’s and young adult fiction include Eto Mori, Hoshi Shinichi, Miyazawa Kenji, Mutsumi Ishii and Masamoto Nasu.

Otherwise, I suggest asking Japanese friends and thinking about what kinds of books you read in your native language and looking for something similar in Japanese. Websites like Bookwalker allow you to read samples, so make use of this as much as possible before choosing a book. Reading reviews on Amazon Japan is another method of testing your reading skills and a way to understand what to expect from a book before buying anything. I follow the tadoku approach to reading in Japanese, so even if I get a book and don’t enjoy it, I just move on to something else.

I would really like to put together some posts on first novels in Japanese at some point to add here so watch this space!

 

This turned into a much longer post than I was expecting, but I hope you find this post useful if you are looking to dive into children’s stories. If there is a resource that I have missed off this list, please let me know in the comments.

10 Japanese-English False Friends

As I’ve covered in a previous post, Japanese loanwords can be trickier than they initially seem. In that post, I wrote about ‘false friends’, where Japanese words that appear to be the same as English can actually have a totally different meaning in Japanese.

I find Japanese-English false friends extremely interesting, so I wanted to post about some of the ones I’ve come across. This is a mix of words that have completely different meaning in English, and words where the meaning has a different nuance to them.

 

1) マンション

Romaji: manshon

 

The word ‘mansion’ in English conjures up the image of a large house with more rooms than anyone would realistically need.

However, in Japanese a mansion is an apartment/ flat/ condominium (normally larger than what the Japanese call アパート).

Source: By アラツク [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D, from Wikimedia Commons

姉はお金持ちで、広いマンションに住んでいます。

あねはおかねもちで、ひろいマンションにすんでいます。

My older sister is rich and lives in a spacious apartment.

 

2) アバウト

Romaji: abauto

 

Like English, アバウト can mean ‘roughly’ or ‘approximately’. In Japanese, it can also mean ‘sloppy’ in regards to someone’s personality (ie. they are not particularly concerned with finer details).

彼はアバウトな性格です。

かれはアバウトなせいかくです。

Literally “he has a sloppy personality”, it could be translated as “he is not a meticulous person”.

 

3) サイダー

Romaji: saidaa

 

As a British person, discovering what Japanese cider really was a bit of a disappointment. In the UK, cider is a type of alcoholic drink normally made with apples (or sometimes using other fruits such as pears).

So imagine my shock when I saw saidaa in the non-alcoholic section of a bar menu! It turns out saidaa is a fizzy soft drink, which is best translated in English as ‘soda’.

 

Source: By Mj-bird [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, from Wikimedia Commons

 

今朝コンビニでサイダーを一本買いました。

けさコンビニでサイダーをいっぽんかいました。

This morning, I bought a bottle of soda at the convenience store.

 

4) スマート

Romaji: sumaato

 

Like English, スマート can mean ‘stylish’ or ‘refined’ in reference to the way someone dresses or acts. However, it can also be used to mean ‘slim’.

彼女はとてもスマートですね。

かのじょはとてもスマートですね。

She is very slim, isn’t she?

 

5) コンセント

Romaji: konsento

 

Originating from ‘concentric plug’, コンセント refers to an electric outlet or plug socket.

テレビをコンセントにつなぎました。

I plugged the TV into the socket.

 

6) サービス

Romaji: saabisu

 

サービス does overlap with the English meaning ‘service’ as in ‘customer service’:

このレストランは、サービスがとてもいいです。

However, サービス can also be used to describe something given as a discount or as a special extra when buying something.

 

これはサービスです。

Literally “this is service”, when buying something at a store this would be used when you get an extra item for free, or a free service offered at a hotel.

 

7)トランプ

Romaji: toranpu

 

Whilst searching this word is quite likely to bring up a certain American president (he’s normally referred to as トランプ氏/ toranpu-shi), トランプ refers to playing cards.

トランプします = play card games

 

昨夜おおじいさんとトランプをしました。

ゆうべおじいさんとトランプをしました。

Last night I played cards with my grandfather.

 

8) Japanese: シール

Romaji: shiiru

 

Shiiru can mean the same as its English counterpart ‘seal’ but is more commonly used to mean ‘sticker’.

手紙に青い花のシールをはりました。

てがみにあおいはなのシールをはりました。

I put a sticker of a blue flower on the letter.

 

9) Japanese: サイン

Romaji: sain

 

サイン means signature or autograph in Japanese. It can also mean sign as in ‘signal’.

この書類をサインしてください。

このしょるいをサインしてください。

Please sign this document.

 

10) Japanese: タレント

Romaji: tarento

 

Talent refers to a TV personality or celebrity in the world of entertainment. There are tons of popular タレント on Japanese TV who are generally there to play games, tell the occasional joke and react to pre recorded material. They may also sing or act in addition to their variety show appearances.

妹は人気なタレントです。

いもうとはにんきなタレントです。

My little sister is a famous TV personality.

 

So that’s it for today’s post – here’s all of the words in today’s post summed up in one image:

As I wrote in my post, sometimes the easiest way to double check the meaning of loanwords is to use Google image search. If there is a different meaning or broader meaning in Japanese compared to its English counterpart, you’ll get a pretty good idea of this from looking at the search results.

I’m interested to know what is your favourite Japanese-English false friend? Let me know in the comments!

Podcast Recommendation: Learn Japanese Pod

Today’s podcast recommendation is Learn Japanese Pod, not to be confused with JapanesePod101!

The podcast was established by Alex, a Brit living in Japan who started the podcast as a way for himself to work on his Japanese skills. Fortunately for us, the podcast has turned out to be a useful resource for us Japanese learners too!

In each podcast, Alex is joined by a native Japanese speaker – regulars include Asuka and Ami – to help explain key points and offer insights on each topic.

Each episode is about 30-40 minutes and are usually based on a certain situation you might find yourself in living in Japan, such as losing your wallet or ordering food at a restaurant. Others focus on ways to express yourself in Japanese (topics have included how to talk about one’s personality and how to express your opinions). The episodes are usually structured around short dialogs, which are then broken down and explained in more detail. These explanations are really useful as they often include cultural information or show examples of how certain phrases are used.

There also episodes called Fun Fridays, where the presenters discuss a topic in relation to Japan and Japanese culture, as well as interviews with those involved with the world of Japanese language learning.

First and foremost, I recommend this podcast because it is enjoyable to listen to. Sometimes with language learning podcasts, the content can feel overly structured and therefore a little bit boring at times. Fortunately, this is not the case with Learn Japanese Pod, despite the length of the episodes. There’s a really good rapport between the presenters which I think really helps to keep each episode as engaging as it is informative.

Another thing that I really like about the podcast is that they are full of useful expressions that reflect Japanese as it is actually spoken. For this reason, this is a great podcast for those who want to build their spoken fluency or focus on expressing themselves more naturally in Japanese. Similarly, as the podcast is dialogue focused, the episodes are great for shadowing.

I also recommend taking a look at the Learn Japanese Pod website, which has downloadable show notes for each episode containing all of the dialogues.

I think that this podcast is especially good for beginner to intermediate learners, who might be taking formal classes. As classes might not always cover ‘real’ Japanese, this is a great complement to the stuff that gets taught in a classroom setting.

You can find the episodes on their website, via any podcasting app, and on the Learn Japanese Pod YouTube channel.

Have you tried this podcast? What did you think? Let me know in the comments!

Tadoku Tuesdays (3): What I’m Reading (in Japanese) in May 2018

tadokutuesdayMay2018

This post is going to be a bit different from previous posts (you can find my previous posts in this series here and here). Normally I write about 2-3 books that I have been reading recently. I really want to narrow down the number of books that I am trying to read at any one time so that I can focus on the books I want to finish. My aim is to read one book at a time, with a manga for the days when I want to read something a bit different.

So going forward, each post will cover is one novel and one manga that I am currently reading, and I will probably also touch upon a couple of books I’ve picked up and will be excited to read in the future.

 

The Novel I’m Reading: 「神様の定食屋」 Kamisama no Teishokuya by Satsuki Nakamura

The main character is 25-year old Tetsushi, who leaves his comfortable office job to help his little sister Shiho run the family restaurant after their parents suddenly die in a car accident. Not having helped out at the restaurant or had any experience with food, he struggles to adapt to this new way of life. One day, he makes a wish at a shrine for help which has an unexpected consequence. After leaving the shrine, he ends up sharing a body with the soul of a recently deceased woman called Tokie.

Tetsushi shares his body with the souls of different people, through which he not only learns about food but also about the importance of life itself. Despite the supernatural theme, there is something very realistic about the main character’s reaction to the situation he finds himself in. As he hadn’t been very involved with the restaurant previously, he quickly develops a greater understanding of his sister, his parents, and how important their little restaurant is to its patrons. There is a lot of time taken to describe some of the dishes served at the restaurant; the dishes themselves play in nicely with the theme of how food can bring people together.

This is a book that I bought on a bit of a whim from Bookwalker a couple of months ago and started to read fairly recently. I like how the themes of food and family are woven together, and the souls that Tetsushi meets are nicely fleshed out characters with interesting stories of their own. I am excited to see how this book ends!

If I had to estimate the book’s difficulty I would probably put it at JLPT N2 level, as the vocabulary used can be quite tricky and more literary in tone than most stuff I read.

 

The Manga I’m Reading: 「のだめカンタービレ」 Nodame Cantabile by Tomoko Ninomiya

Megumi Noda (nicknamed Nodame) is a talented although eccentric pianist. She crosses paths and instantly falls in love with Shinichi Chiaki, the top student at the music college she attends. Shinichi finds it hard to appreciate Nodame’s sloppy approach to music playing at first, due to his perfectionist tendencies. They both have their own musical challenges to face, but ultimately have a positive influence upon each other as time passes.

I saw the drama adaptation of this manga some time ago; in fact, it was probably one of the first Jdramas I watched (it is available to watch on Crunchyroll if you are interested). I absolutely loved the drama version and now that I am reading the manga, I can tell that the adaptation has been pretty faithful to the source material.

The main characters Nodame and Chiaki are great together and it is interesting to see how their relationship develops. I am not particularly musically minded, but I still love the musical setting of the manga and how music is used to bring people together.

In terms of language level, I’d probably put this at JLPT N3 – musical terms aside, the vocabulary isn’t too tricky, but the lack of furigana increases the difficulty a little bit. I believe that there are bilingual versions of the first few volumes available.

You can read a sample of the manga here.

 

Books in my To Be Read pile:

There are two physical books that I have purchased recently:

  • 「ホームレス中学生」 Hoomuresu Chuugakusei by Hiroshi Tamura

I’ve wanted to read this book for a very long time, so I was really excited to find this book on eBay a few weeks ago. I know that this novel is based on a true story, where the author (now a famous comedian) recalls his experience of finding himself homeless as a young teenager. The book was very popular when it was first released in 2007, and there were a drama and film adaptations made soon after.

  • 「ステップファザー・ステップ」 Steppu Fazaa Steppu by Miyuki Miyabe

I’ve only recently ordered this book and it hasn’t arrived yet, so I can’t really comment in much depth on this one. I’ve never read anything by Miyuki Miyabe before (and she has such a huge body of work!) so I will be excited to read it when I finish my other books.

As convenient as it is to buy ebooks, it is nice to sit down with an actual book when I get the time, so I am very much looking forward to reading them!

 

So that’s it for today’s post! What are you reading at the moment (in Japanese or otherwise)? Do you have any recommendations for me? Let me know in the comments!

Manga Recommendation: Oremonogatari

There’s been a bit of a delay getting my latest blog post out, apologies.

Today’s manga recommendation for Japanese learners is My Love Story!!/ Oremonogatari!! (俺物語!!), a manga series created by Kazune Kawahara. This is a nice comedy/ slice of life manga that I think is pretty simple to follow, even for upper beginners.

Quick Facts

 

Author: Kazune Kawahara (河原和音) and Aruko (アルコ)

Genre: Romance, comedy, slice of life

No. of volumes: 13

Recommended for: JLPT N4/ upper beginner

Furigana: Yes

Anime/ drama/ film adaptations?: Yes, anime and live-action film adaptations

 

Source: ebookJapan website

 

Plot Overview

This manga is about a high school student named Takeo Goda. Takeo is very tall and muscular which can make him look intimidating, but he has a very kind and caring personality. Whilst his athletic prowess earns him the respect of his male classmates, he is used to his best friend Makoto Sunakawa getting all of the female attention. One day, Takeo crosses paths with Rinko Yamato who actually appears to be interested in him. Is this a chance for Takeo to have a love story of his own?

 

Why do I recommend the manga?

This manga has the right mix of funny and heartwarming to keep you reading. Takeo as the main character is so charming and likable that you find yourself rooting for him from the very beginning, despite his obvious lack of common sense. The manga goes straight for the type of humour you would expect from a character like Takeo, although it always feels good-natured.

His best friend Makoto acts as a nice counterbalance to Takeo’s headstrong personality, helping to keep him grounded. I like how the manga sidesteps the all-too-common love triangle; Makoto very much encourages the budding relationship between Takeo and Rinko.

Similarly, there are a variety of other supporting characters who are mostly there to support the romance in one way or another. As a result, the story can seem a bit formulaic in parts, but the way the characters are written helps to keep things engaging.

 

Recommended Japanese language level

I consider this manga to be appropriate for JLPT N4 or upper beginner level and above. Most of the dialogue is short, and aside from the way Takeo himself talks, there isn’t too much slang to deal with.

In addition, being a slice of life manga, there isn’t any specialist vocabulary to contend with. Together with the presence of furigana, I think this is a great manga to try and read in Japanese if you are looking to read manga in Japanese for the first time. It also helps that the manga volumes aren’t too long, and I find that once I start reading I can get through the volumes pretty quickly.

As always, you can read a sample of this manga on the EbookJapan website to get a feel for its difficulty by clicking the blue ‘無料立ち読み’ button.

There is an anime adaptation of this manga which is available on Crunchyroll. The live-action film adaptation was released in 2015 and you can find the trailer for it here.

 

If you do try reading any of the recommendations, please let me know how you get on the comments. I am always on the hunt for beginner friendly manga, so if you have any suggestions please let me know!

If you do like this recommendation, you might also like:

Happy Reading!