Manga Recommendation: Orange

Today’s recommendation is Orange by Ichigo Takano. I have been meaning to read this for a while and I am so glad that I finally got round to reading it!

The story centres around a girl called Naho who receives a letter from herself 10 years in the future, warning her to make changes to her actions at high school to prevent a tragedy linked to her friendship group from happening in the future. The letter comes with a diary giving certain key dates and events that all help to change the future for the better. By heeding these warnings, Naho not only impacts the future of those around her but also learns a great deal about herself in the process. The manga switches back and forth between the present day Naho and the future version of herself, which is particularly engaging as you get increasingly curious about what has happened in the intervening years.

Orange grabbed me immediately and I couldn’t stop myself from reading it until I got to the end. I think the idea of wanting to go back in time and change things is something that everyone can relate to, especially when looking back to your school days. In addition, the relationships amongst Naho’s friendship group is particularly pleasant to read and this only makes the dramatic aspects of this manga more powerful. Part high school drama, part sci-fi, the blend between the two genres make the manga accessible but a little bit different from other slice of life manga you may have come across previously.

I recommend this manga to Japanese learners because the language used is everyday – no specialist vocabulary required. If you’re familiar with common slang, particularly within the high school setting, then following the characters’ dialogues is pretty straightforward. In terms of language level, I would recommend this for N4-N3 learners.

Boosting your Japanese skills with super short stories

When practising reading skills in Japanese, having to tackle a long article with a dictionary can be daunting. Literature in particular can be tricky to understand depending on the author’s writing style. With this in mind, I started looking for really short stories for Japanese practice.

I was concerned that when reading shorter stories you are having to rely much more on inferring certain things from the text which would make them a lot trickier than longer passages which have the space to explain the story in greater depth. However I needn’t have worried too much because the majority of short stories do a great job of setting the scene quickly whilst using language that is too complicated. Having said that, the stories on the websites I mention below may not be the easiest to follow as a complete newbie to Japanese. These stories should be a good place to start for intermediate learners – beginners may be interested in starting with my posts on beginner reading resources instead.

The shortest of short stories are the so called ‘one minute stories’. For us language learners it is unlikely we can read it in one minute but the brevity of the stories still makes it accessible in only a few minutes, making it much easier to fit in a quick study session whilst you having a coffee break or waiting for the bus.

I’ve looked online for some resources with really short stories in Japanese that are much easier to tackle and found a couple of sites that are full of these super short stories:

The first website I can recommend is called Kakuyomu, which has a whole host of 1 minute stories written by amateur Japanese writers. My favourite one of the ones I’ve read so far is called 「赤ん坊の思惑」- it is the definition of a short but sweet story in my opinion.

The second website I want to introduce has lots of 300 character stories which is supposed to be the equivalent of 1 minute’s reading time, all written by an author known as 海見みみみ. I’ve read quite a few of these and really enjoyed them – my recommendations include「留学前夜」,「思い出コレクター」and「魔法女子になりませんか」. I think the stories on this website are on the whole more accessible than Kakuyomu.jp, so don’t be too disheartened if you find the stories on there too difficult – you may have better luck with these stories.

I’ve certainly found it really rewarding reading some of these quick stories and love how easy they are to fit into my day. It’s definitely a good way of boosting your tadoku count!

Are there any stories you’ve particularly enjoyed? Let me know in the comments 🙂

Reading Resources for Japanese Beginners: Part 2

As promised, here are three more reading resources for Japanese beginners that are not news article focused.

JP-Lang

This website has a variety of resources for Japanese language learners, but I specifically recommend that beginners take a look at some of the beginner level dialogues (there are also a few essays about Japanese culture in the reading section as well). Whether you are looking at the essays or the dialogues, both are good for reading practice as each allows you to set the kanji on or off as well as the English translation. As a beginner you do not always want to jump into reading a longer article, and dialogues in particular are a good way of ensuring you are picking up the correct situational words and phrases across various topics.

Wasabi’s Fairy Tales and Short Stories with Easy Japanese 

Wasabi has five stories (a mixture of Japanese classics and traditional Western stories like Jack and the Beanstalk) broken down into a number of lessons that split the story up into shorter sections. Each lesson has audio (at both slow speed and normal speed), furigana, English translations and a vocabulary list. Wasabi recommends these story lessons at N4 level learners and I think this series offers a good entry point for upper beginners to start studying famous Japanese stories.

You may also want to check out Wasabi’s series on learning Japanese expressions through manga.

Hukumusume

This is a Japanese language website full of children’s stories. Do not be put off by the fact that this is aimed at Japanese children because it still remains a good resource for Japanese learners, because each story is accompanied by audio.

Finding easy Japanese fiction can be difficult, but the children’s stories are written in a simple enough way for Japanese learners to try reading. There is no furigana or English translations here, so having a plugin like Rikaichan here is recommended for looking up unknown words quickly. There are children’s stories from around the world on this website, so you may prefer to start with a story from the 世界の昔話 section where you can select stories from a country of your choice and focus on stories you are alresdy familiar with.

Manga Recommendation : 甘党ペンギン by けんじそにし

Today’s recommendation is 甘党ペンギン(あまとうペンギン/ amatou pengin/ ‘Sweets Penguin’) by Kenji Sonishi. This is a manga series about Penta (ペン太) the penguin who is a rather well known attraction living at the local zoo. He begins to frequent a coffee shop run by a young man called Inoguchi. Naturally, Inoguchi is not only shocked by a penguin visiting his cafe but also by Penta’s dedication to trying out various desserts and sweet treats with his coffee.

Each chapter showcases two or three of these desserts that do actually exist in Japan, particularly Hokkaido.

 

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I can personally vouch for LeTao’s desserts being absolutely amazing

The chapter then ends with ratings and comments on each of the desserts featured. Like Cooking Papa I do not advise reading on an empty stomach as you will get hungry!
Whilst Japanese learners outside of Japan may not be interested in how these desserts are rated, I still recommend this manga. The interactions between the various characters at the cafe are entertaining to read. More importantly, the language in this manga is much more accessible than others and so I think if you have covered all N5 grammar and vocabulary you would be able to get started with this fairly easily. Furigana is included with all kanji characters which allows you to look up unfamiliar words, and each chapter is fairly short which are both pluses for beginner learners.

Have you read this manga? Let me know what you think in the comments!

Reading Resources for Japanese Beginners: Part 1

When starting out with Japanese, it can be really difficult to find appropriate language learning materials. I myself struggled with this – the usual recommendations of books aimed at children, but these are often full of unusual or nonsensical vocabulary.

Fortunately nowadays there are much better (and free!) resources out there for Japanese beginners. Here are a few of my favourites that are appropriate for JLPT level N5-N4 learners.

Watanoc

This is a free web news magazine with short and interesting articles aimed at Japanese beginners up to intermediate level. You can filter by JLPT level, or narrow down articles by topic if you prefer. If you click on certain pieces of vocabulary you can check the kanji reading and English meaning. Translations of each article are available in English, Vietnamese or Chinese. The articles have a lot of pictures , as well as the Japanese audio too which all in all makes it a great place to read interesting stories about Japan.

Hirogaru

Like Watanoc, this is a website with short articles on Japanese culture aimed at students of the language. It is an excellent site for practising your reading comprehension as you have to option to add furigana, hide the vocabulary lists and a mini quiz at the end of each article to test your understanding. All articles have pictures and short video clips as well as the Japanese audio which provides a fun multimedia experience. The articles are grouped by topic, so you can easily focus on a topic of your choice. There is no indication of the level of language used, but I believe that the articles are very accessible to N5 and N4 level learners.

Coscom

This website has been around for a fairly long time, but still remains a really good resource for Japanese learners. There are a lot of learning materials on the Coscom website, but I particularly recommend the Weather Forecast and the Headline News articles for upper beginners (in terms of vocabulary and grammar I’d estimate this to ne around N4 level) on the left hand side bar. Both pages are comprehensive in content as they have the option to view the articles in romaji, kana or kanji and also include Japanese audio, vocabulary and grammar points used. Unfortunately only the most recent articles are available for free but it is worth checking the website every week or so for new material to read.

Matcha Magazine – やさしい日本語 version

The English language Matcha Magazine website is a Japanese travel magazine full of recommendations for places to visit and things to do in Japan. I recently discovered that if you click on the languages drop down menu, you can change the website language from English to やさしい日本語. This allows you to read the same types of travel articles but in simpler Japanese compared to the Japaneese version of the website.

Each article comes with furigana and English for some of the katakana words (this is pretty useful as some words can be incredibly difficult to work out!). As this does not have a lookup feature within the website and does not directly link to the English language versions of the same article, I’d say this website is better for upper beginner to intermediate learners (N4 and above).

I hope the above four websites are of some use to Japanese beginners. I am aware that all of the above are either news articles or non-fiction, so if you are looking for something a bit different to the above keep your eyes peeled for Part 2.

‘Appy Mondays: Mondo

Have you been studying Japanese for a while but scared of reading articles in Japanese? Looking for a simple Japanese news aggregate app with dictionary lookup functionality? Then Mondo is definitely the app for you!

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I have had this app installed for some time, but after playing around with the app to understand more fully all of the features it has I can definitely recommend this to intermediate learners looking to improve their article reading skills. I have reviewed other reading apps before as part of this series, but what sets this app aside from these others is that it offers a better reading experience for learners by including dictionary lookup and a flashcard feature amongst other things. I’ve outlined some of the app’s main features below:

  • Article reading. All articles have a word lookup function when you highlight a word or phrase, and includes recording of its pronounciation by a native speaker. You can toggle furigana on or off, and some articles have links to the English translation to check your understanding of the Japanese text.
  • Vocabulary lists. Words you come across in articles can be bookmarked, which then can be viewed later and added to a vocabulary list. There are also preset lists, with lists such as all levels of the JLPT, Joyo (general use) kanji and business related language. You can then test yourself on this vocabulary in the form of electronic flashcards, Anki style. My only gripe with this is that with the preset lists testing from English to Japanese, the English terms can be so obtuse at times that coming up with the correct Japanese term can seem nearly impossible sometimes.
  • Handshake is a feature you can use to find Japanese language learning parterns. You can choose a partner by swiping right on the people you are interested in chatting with – if you get a mutual handshake, you’ve just found a language exchange partner! The obvious similarities to Tinder here have put me off trying this feature out, but it could be a good alternative to a dedicated app like Hello Talk.
  • Study log. When reading articles, the app measures how long it takes you to read the article, and how long you have spent reading in total. It also measures Characters per Minute (CPM) which is used as a benchmark for what level the app considers your language learning level to be at.

I think that the above features packed into one app for free represents a really good deal. It is worth mentioning that there is a premium version of the app, which gives you acccess to audio recordings of each article (the free version lets you listen to one article every fortnight) as well as short dialogues by native speakers and costs 480 yen per month. For 1800 yen per month, the premium membership also grants yo access to Japanese language teachers who are there to help you out with any Japanese related questions you may have. Given the prices, I am not sure if the premium membership represents good value for money, but as a free app I am impressed by its current offering.

Find out more about the app on the official website.

PS. If you are on the lookout for a similar type of reading app, check my previous reviews:

‘Appy Mondays – News Easy Japanese

‘Appy Mondays -NHK News Reader