The Best 7 Android Apps for learning Japanese

I review Japanese learning apps on this blog fairly often, but in reality there are only a small number of Japanese learning apps that I have regularly used on my language journey so far. There are also a few apps that I wish I’d had access to when I was a beginner. For that reason, I thought I would put together a list of the best Android apps out there for learning Japanese!

The best thing is that these apps are either free or available at a low cost. As I almost exclusively use Android devices, this list was made with Android users in mind, but actually, many of these are available on the Apple Store too.

 

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1) An app to introduce you to Japanese: Lingodeer

Cost: free; also available on iOS

 

If you like the idea of using an app like Duolingo, then I recommend trying out Lingodeer instead. Lingodeer was initially aimed at those learning Mandarin, Korean or Japanese (French, Spanish, German, Portuguese and Vietnamese are also available) and so the lessons are tailored towards these languages in a better way than Duolingo.

Lingodeer starts by teaching hiragana and katakana, which makes it a great choice for absolute beginners. Like Duolingo, the app has a number of lessons increasing in complexity covering a number of different themes. Each lesson starts out with some grammar notes (called ‘Learning Tips’), then a number of smaller topics covering a few grammar points and vocabulary under the given theme. You also have the ability to toggle the use of kanji, furigana and romaji within the lessons if you wish.

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When it comes to the lesson quizzes, the app tests your understanding in a few different ways. Successfully passing the quizzes earns you XP, and allows you to move on to the next lesson. Similarly, there isn’t a heavy reliance on English for learning new vocabulary; instead, the focus is on using lots of images to convey meanings. There is a ‘Test Out’ feature which allows you to skip ahead if you can pass the tests.

I wouldn’t necessarily recommend using Lingodeer as a resource on its own, but I think it is a great way to supplement learning using another textbook. Alternatively, I think it is a nice app to use if you have taken a break from Japanese and perhaps want to review the basics before starting new material.

 

2) The textbook app: Human Japanese

Cost: Human Japanese Lite is free, full version £8.99; also available on iOS

 

Speaking of textbook style apps, I would highly recommend the app Human Japanese.

This app has a textbook style app that takes you through hiragana, katakana and the basics of Japanese grammar. All aspects of the language are explained in a very clear and straightforward manner, imparting a lot of information designed to give as much context as possible to what you are learning. The grammar lessons are also supplemented with relevant information on Japanese culture – you cannot understand the language without understanding the culture after all!

This short video gives you an overview of what Human Japanese is all about:

A lot of time and effort has clearly gone into Human Japanese – the quality of the app is great. All example sentences have crisp audio and example sentences have ‘ingredients’ which break down the sentence into its component parts, which is useful as sentences get more complex.

The full version of the app is not free and requires a one-off payment, but there is plenty of free content for Japanese newbies to work through to see if the app is appropriate for them before making a commitment. Looking at the content of the textbook, Human Japanese provides a solid foundation on which learners can continue to build on. I’ve written about Human Japanese in a previous post so I recommend checking that out if you would like to learn more.

 

3) The best Japanese dictionary app: Akebi

Cost: free

 

I have tried a number of free Japanese dictionary apps available on Android, but Akebi is by far my favourite. Again, this is another app that I have written a post about on this blog.

The sheer number of features that Akebi has makes it a great learner friendly app. These include:

  • Inbuilt Japanese keyboard – no worrying about switching keyboards just to look something up
  • Detailed kanji information (including frequency, JLPT level, words containing that kanji)
  • Handwriting recognition and ability to search by radicals
  • Deconjugation – if you look up a verb in the te-form, it will find the verb in its dictionary form along with meanings and other useful information
  • Full functionality offline, perfect for when I am avoiding the internet during study sessions!
  • Example sentences

One of my favourite features relates to Anki; whenever I use the app to look up new words, I can immediately add them to a flashcard deck of my choice in Anki to review later.

Overall, I find that it has the right balance of user-friendly interface and powerful features that make it the perfect companion for Japanese learners at all levels.

 

4) The best app for practicing Japanese with native speakers: HelloTalk

Cost: free; also available on iOS

 

One of the biggest issues Japanese learners tend to have if they are not living in Japan is lack of access to native speakers. Fortunately, language exchange apps like HelloTalk are the next best thing to address this issue.

When you sign up for an account, you can select the languages you are interested in learning, as well as the languages you can speak. You can then post a message to native speakers of the language you are learning and find an exchange partner. When speaking with your language partner, you can post in your target language or record audio/ have a video call.

HelloTalk has expanded into a sort of social network for language learners. You can now post status updates on your profile called ‘Moments’, which other members can correct any language mistakes for you.

The above Youtube video by Reina Scully gives a good overview of how the app can be used to study Japanese.

HelloTalk has a couple of handy features for language learners. For example, as Reina mentions in her video, the Translate feature allows you to see translations from your target language by tapping any word or phrase. In addition, the Notepad feature also enables you to save a message or recording for later practice.

I think HelloTalk is a great way to find a language partner or even to practice your reading skills by reading other users’ Moments.

 

5) The best reading assistant app: TangoRisto

Cost: free, ad free version requires one off payment of £4.29; also available on iOS

 

Reading in Japanese can be a scary experience at first, but TangoRisto is a great app to build your confidence. TangoRisto draws together articles from NHK News Easy among other sources which you can read via the app.

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As you can see from the screenshots, the interface is crisp, clean and very user friendly. Once in an article, a quick tap of a word brings up its reading and meaning. Like Akebi, tapping a conjugated verb will bring up the dictionary form of the verb with a note to indicate the form it has within the text (eg. passive tense, past tense). You can then bookmark these words to revise in the Vocabulary Review part of the app.

I like the ability to only highlight and/or show the furigana for words at certain JLPT levels as chosen in the settings, as well as the ability to save articles for offline reading. There is also a Text Analyzer tool, where you can paste Japanese text into the textbox; by then clicking ‘Analyze’, you can click on any word to find its readings and meanings.

Considering that this app is free to use, it is a quality resource for Japanese reading practice. It is definitely an app that I wish had been around sooner, especially when preparing for the JLPT tests!

I have a post reviewing TangoRisto which might be worth reading if you want to know more about the app.

 

6) The best app for vocabulary reviews: Anki

Cost: free; also available on iOS (for a price)

 

I haven’t always been a fan of Anki, but it is on my list because when used correctly it can be a very powerful tool. Whilst there is a free Anki app available on Android, Anki is available on a number of mobile and desktop platforms.

Anki (anki is the Japanese word for ‘memorisation’) is a spaced repetition flashcard app that has a high degree of customisation. Putting together your own flashcard decks tailored to the type of Japanese content you want to study (ie. from your favourite TV show, video game or novel) is a great way to learn Japanese and stay motivated.

There is a bit of time required to experiment with what kind of flashcard set up works best for you. If making your own flashcard decks sounds like too much trouble, there are some great flashcard decks available for download via the Shared Decks. Some of my favourite shared decks are the Kanji Damage deck and the Core 2000 vocabulary decks.

This video by Landon Epps gives a nice overview of some of the features Anki has and how Japanese learners can use it to review vocabulary.

Anki is a great app because it can be used to help memorise all sorts of things, not just the Japanese language. If you like looking at data, there are all sorts of statistics you can look into regarding your learning and progress for each flashcard deck.

 

7) Best app for Kanji: Kanji Study

Cost: limited content is free, full app costs £11.99; older version of app available on iOS

 

If you are looking for an app to specifically help you with kanji, look no further than Kanji Study. I love the user interface, and there are so many features to help you customise your kanji learning experience.

You can choose to tackle kanji in any order of your choice, but the default is the order in which Japanese children learn Joyo kanji at school by year. You can then break down each level into smaller groups of your choice. In the ‘Study’ mode, each kanji has its own page showing the stroke order, radicals, common readings, useful vocabulary and example sentences to help reinforce the meaning. If you long press a word, you then get the option to add it to an Anki deck or look it up via another website such as jisho.org – both very useful features!

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You can then choose to review the kanji via flashcards, multiple choice quizzes or writing challenges. These tests are highly customisable so that you can tailor your study sessions to focus on your weaknesses. The app also allows you to practice writing kanji. I like that the app uses a very readable kanji font which is much closer to how kanji would be handwritten rather than a typed font.

It is possible to set a daily study target, and you can set notification reminders to make sure you don’t miss a study session.

The beginner level kanji content is free, however access to all kanji requires a one-off cost of £11.99. All in all, I highly recommend this app because the quality of the app is top-notch.

 

Honourable mentions

There are a lot of apps which are great alternatives to some of the apps on my top 7 list:

Hello Talk -> HiNative

HiNative is fairly similar to Hello Talk, but I find HiNative better for learning about the current trends or asking questions about the culture of your target language. You can read my full review of HiNative here.

 

Anki -> Memrise/ iKnow

If you prefer an app that makes use of spaced repetition with a more user-friendly interface, then I recommend checking out Memrise or iKnow.

Memrise has its own starter courses for the Japanese language, however, I cannot comment on their quality as I have not tried this out for myself yet. Instead, I like to use the Memrise app to study some of the courses created by other users for certain aspects of Japanese, such as JTalkOnline’s keigo course. Recently Memrise has made it difficult to search for these user-generated vocabulary courses (via the app anyway – they are still easy to find via the website), which is a slight annoyance.

iKnow requires a monthly subscription (a free trial is available), but I think the Core 1000/ 3000/ 6000 vocabulary decks help build a good grounding in Japanese knowledge if you are not interested in making your own vocabulary flashcards.

 

Akebi -> Tangorin

Tangorin is another free dictionary app available on both Android and iOS, which also works fully offline.

 

TangoRisto -> Mondo

Mondo is another reading assistant app aimed to help Japanese learners. Mondo tends to pull its reading content from different sources compared to TangoRisto, and there is some original articles and dialogues that can only be read on the app. I’ve covered how Mondo works in an earlier blog post.

 

So that is my list of the best apps available for learning Japanese on Android. Do you agree with my list, or is there a glaring omission? Please tell me in the comments 🙂

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Should you learn to write by hand in Japanese?

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We live in an increasingly digital world. As a consequence, the importance of handwriting has diminished – why write a letter when you can send an email? A lot of Japanese learners may think that learning to write Japanese by hand is a waste of time.

Especially with all the apps and other digital materials out there for Japanese study, it is even easier to skip learning handwritten Japanese and to stick to typing kana and kanji instead.

The major argument for avoiding writing Japanese is often that Japanese people don’t remember how to write kanji any more. There is certainly evidence to suggest this is a growing trend.

So, in the light of all this, is learning to handwrite Japanese worth it for Japanese learners?

When it comes to studying Japanese, I believe that learning to write by hand is a good skill to have, although in a lot of situations handwriting is no longer necessary in Japan.

How important it is for you as a Japanese learner to practice handwriting will depend on two questions.

The first question to ask yourself is: ‘What is your language goal?’

If this includes living in Japan at some point, being able to handwrite the basics is a minimum requirement. Particularly in rural areas, you will be required to write certain things such as your address by hand when completing essential tasks such as setting up a bank account.

Similarly, if you want to become a student in Japan you could get asked to write rather than type your assignments. Needless to say, attending a language school in Japan will involve writing your homework by hand.

The second question to ask yourself is: ‘How do you study best?’

I am always writing things down as a way of remembering things. For me, this also applies to language learning: I personally find it much easier to memorise new vocabulary/ kanji when I write them out by hand.

There is some evidence to suggest that in general, writing is a more effective way to study compared to typing.

Ultimately you are the person who has the deepest understanding of how you learn best. If you don’t have to write things down in order to remember them, then using handwriting as a study method is likely to be a futile exercise.

A couple of caveats…

Technology is a great thing, but you shouldn’t be entirely reliant on it. Making sure you recognise how things should look in written Japanese will avoid any potential for embarrassment.

I would recommend learning the stroke order of radicals – having a basic knowledge of the building blocks of kanji means you’ll be able to write neatly should you find yourself in a situation where you absolutely must handwrite Japanese.

In addition, whether you decide to learn to write by hand in Japanese or not, there are differences between handwritten and typed fonts for both kana and kanji, so make sure that you as a Japanese learner are aware of these.

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Note: TheJapanGirl’s post on this topic has some great infographics and is definitely worth checking out!

I am interested to hear other people’s opinions on this. Do you think that handwriting is a necessity in today’s age, whether that be in Japanese or any other language?

 

Image source: http://la-lievre.seesaa.net/article/165005808.html 

Writing Challenge Roundup

We are now into December, so that means that the 30 day Japanese Writing Challenge for November has finished. Doing this challenge was definitely harder in practice than I had thought it would be when I was planning it!

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If you’ve missed my previous posts on it, see the links below:

Intro Post

Week 1

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4

Week 5

Here’s a few things I realised during the challenge:

  • Having a dedicated journal near me at all times made it easier to sit down and write every day

I have a smallish notebook that I bought for jotting blog ideas down in – I chose to use this for the writing challenge because I always make sure to have it in my bag. Whenever I opened my bag during the day I would see it and that would remind me to write something down when I had a spare 5 minutes.

  • Having a writing prompt everyday took the stress out of deciding what to write about

This allowed me to focus on how to express myself in Japanese more than usual.

  • There’s a lot of kanji that I recognise but have forgotten how to write!

I’m so used to typing Japanese on my phone that when it comes to handwriting thinking of the co. There were a few days that I only had time to write my answers on my phone and not in my journal which made writing a much quicker process. For me, handwriting Japanese aids my memory so I will be focusing more on this in the future

If you’ve enjoyed this challenge and are looking for regular writing prompts, I recommend checking out this Hatena blog page (in Japanese). Each week they post a new writing prompt for bloggers to write about.

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If you scroll down the page you can read other people’s posts in relation to the weekly prompt, which is great reading practice!

I would really like to put together some other 30 day challenges in the future, so watch this space! The challenge can be taken at any time and at your own pace – it’s ok to miss a day out if you need to.

Please let me know how you found the challenge in the comments 🙂

Kotobites November Writing Challenge: Week 5: 27th – 30th Nov

Welcome to the 5th and final week of the Kotobites November Japanese Writing Challenge. In case you missed it, please take a look my intro post on what this is and why I’m doing it – you can do as little or as much as you can!

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Here are the writing prompts for Week 5 (up to 30th November):

27th Nov (Monday) 27日(月曜日)

将来の夢はなんですか。

しょうらいのゆめはなんですか。

What is your dream for the future?

 

28th Nov (Tues) 28日(火曜日)

どこにでも行けるなら、どこを旅行したいですか。

どこにでもいけるなら、どこをりょこうしたいですか。

If you could go anywhere, where would you like to travel to?

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29th Nov (Wed) 29日(水曜日)

今はまっていることはなんですか。

いまはまっていることはなんですか。

What are you obsessed with right now?

 

30th Nov (Thur) 30日(木曜日)

口癖ありますか。

くちぐせありますか。

Is there a phrase/saying you use often? (note: could also be a verbal tic – think Homer Simpson and “D’oh!”)

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Hints for beginners

  • Looking to get your writing checked? I recommend Lang-8 (if already a member – unfortunately, they are no longer taking new registrations), HiNative or ask a friend/language partner.
  • Following the sentence structure of the question is the easiest way of constructing the answer. Feel free to expand on the questions as much as possible or adapting the question – whatever suits your stage of learning.

This marks the end of the Writing Challenge – well done if you’ve made it this far!

If you’ve missed week 1, week 2, week 3, or week 4 click to catch up on the writing prompts. If you’ve managed to get to the end of the writing challenge, please let me know how you’ve found it in the comments 🙂

Kotobites November Writing Challenge: Week 4: 20th – 26th Nov

Welcome to the Kotobites November Japanese Writing Challenge. In case you missed it, please take a look my intro post on what this is and why I’m doing it – you can do as little or as much as you can!

writingchallenge_1_original

Here are the writing prompts for Week 4 (up to 26th November):

20th Nov (Monday) 20日(月曜日)

今一番欲しいものはなんですか。

いまいちばんほしいものはなんですか。

What item do you want the most at the moment?

 

21st Nov (Tues) 21日(火曜日)

楽器が弾けますか。(弾けない人は、弾けるようになりたい楽器ありますか。)

がっきがひけますか。(ひけいないひとは、ひけるようになりたいがっきありますか。)

Can you play a musical instrument? (If you can’t: is there a musical instrument you would like to learn to play?)

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22nd Nov (Wed) 22日(水曜日)

宝くじを当たったら、何をしますか。

たからくじをあたったら、なにをしますか。

If you won the lottery, what would you do?

 

23rd Nov (Thur) 23日(木曜日)

好きな祝日は何ですか。

すきなしゅくじつはなんですか。

What is your favourite national holiday?

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24th Nov (Fri) 24日(金曜日)

明日世界が滅亡したら、最後の食事は何を食べたいですか。

あしたせかいはめつぼうしたら、さいごのしょくじはなにをたべたいですか。

If the world was going to end tomorrow, what would you eat as your last meal?

 

25th Nov (Sat) 25日 (土曜日)

一番好きなことわざは何ですか。

いちばんすきなことわざはなんですか。

What is your favourite saying?

 

26th Nov (Sun) 26日 (日曜日)

虫は好きですか。

むしはすきですか。

Do you like insects?

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Hints for beginners

  • Looking to get your writing checked? I recommend Lang-8 (if already a member – unfortunately they are no longer taking new registrations), HiNative or ask a friend/language partner.
  • Following the sentence structure of the question is the easiest way of constructing the answer. Feel free to expand on the questions as much as possible or adapting the question – whatever suits your stage of learning.

If you’ve missed week 1, week 2 or week 3, click to catch up on the writing prompts. If you have already started on this challenge, feel free to check in and let me know how you are getting on 🙂

Kotobites November Writing Challenge: Week 3: 13th – 19th Nov

writingchallenge_1_original

Welcome to the Kotobites November Japanese Writing Challenge. In case you missed it, please take a look my intro post on what this is and why I’m doing it – you can do as little or as much as you can!

If you’ve missed week 1 and week 2, click to catch up on the writing prompts.

Here are the writing prompts for Week 3 (up to 19th November):

 

13th Nov (Monday) 13日(月曜日)

あだ名はありますか。ある人は、何と呼ばれていますか。

あだなはありますか。あるひとは、なんとよばれていますか。

Do you have a nickname? If so, what is it?

 

14th Nov (Tues) 14日(火曜日)

学生のとき、好きだった科目は何ですか。

がくせいのとき、すきだったかもくはなんですか。

Which school subject was your favourite at school?

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15th Nov (Wed) 15日(水曜日)

一番感謝していることは何ですか。

いちばんかんしゃしていることはなんですか。

What is the thing you are most thankful for?

 

16th Nov (Thur) 16日(木曜日)

特技は何ですか。

とくぎはなんですか。

What is your special skill?

 

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17th Nov (Fri) 17日(金曜日)

テレビに出てみたいですか。

 

テレビにでてみたいですか。

Would you like to be on TV?

 

18th Nov (Sat)    18日 (土曜日)

尊敬する人は誰ですか。

そんけいするひとはだれですか。

Who do you admire?

 

19th Nov (Sun) 19日 (日曜日)

どこに住んでいますか。どんなところですか。

どこにすんでいますか。どんなところですか。

Where do you live? What kind of place is it?

 

Hints for beginners

  • Looking to get your writing checked? I recommend Lang-8 (if already a member, unfortunately they are no longer taking new registrations), HiNative or ask a friend/language partner.
  • Following the sentence structure of the question is the easiest way of constructing the answer. Feel free to expand on the questions as much as possible or adapting the question – whatever suits your stage of learning.

 

If you have already started on this challenge, feel free to check in and let me know how you are getting on 🙂

Conjunctions in Japanese

Once you have understood the basic sentence structure of Japanese, you may find yourself wondering how to make your sentences flow. The easiest way to do this is by making use of connecting words (aka conjunctions) to link two sentences or two clauses together.

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Being as Kotobites is in the midst of the November Japanese Writing Challenge, I thought this would be a great time to post about the topic of conjunctions, known as 接続詞 in Japanese. I’ve listed some common conjunctions below under various categories to give you some ideas:

  • Showing a result or consequence (= therefore/ so in English): だから、それで、そのため
  • Giving a reason (= because): なぜなら、というのは
  • Showing a contradiction (= but/ however): が at the end of the clause; しかし、けれども
  • Providing additional information (= similarly, and then, furthermore): そして、それに、それから、しかも
  • Showing a contrast (= on the other hand): 一方、逆に
  • Rephrasing (= in other words): つまり、すなわち

I have shied away from using English where possible here as a lot of these conjunctions do not work in exactly the same way as their English counterparts.

For further information I recommend checking out the following resources:

The Japan Society of New York’s Waku Waku Japanese series has an episode giving a brief introduction to how conjunctions work:

Wasabi’s articles on Major Conjunctions in Japanese as well as Reverse Conditionals (which covers conjunctions and grammar points that express a contrast).

For those who are a bit more advanced, check out this page (in Japanese) on a website called Pothos which gives an overview of the types of conjunctions you are likely to come across. If you click on each word you get a definition and a few example sentences to show how it is used.

 

I hope you find this post useful – as always if you have any suggestions or feedback please let me know in the comments!