Manga Recommendation: Oremonogatari

There’s been a bit of a delay getting my latest blog post out, apologies.

Today’s manga recommendation for Japanese learners is My Love Story!!/ Oremonogatari!! (俺物語!!), a manga series created by Kazune Kawahara. This is a nice comedy/ slice of life manga that I think is pretty simple to follow, even for upper beginners.

Quick Facts

 

Author: Kazune Kawahara (河原和音) and Aruko (アルコ)

Genre: Romance, comedy, slice of life

No. of volumes: 13

Recommended for: JLPT N4/ upper beginner

Furigana: Yes

Anime/ drama/ film adaptations?: Yes, anime and live-action film adaptations

 

Source: ebookJapan website

 

Plot Overview

This manga is about a high school student named Takeo Goda. Takeo is very tall and muscular which can make him look intimidating, but he has a very kind and caring personality. Whilst his athletic prowess earns him the respect of his male classmates, he is used to his best friend Makoto Sunakawa getting all of the female attention. One day, Takeo crosses paths with Rinko Yamato who actually appears to be interested in him. Is this a chance for Takeo to have a love story of his own?

 

Why do I recommend the manga?

This manga has the right mix of funny and heartwarming to keep you reading. Takeo as the main character is so charming and likable that you find yourself rooting for him from the very beginning, despite his obvious lack of common sense. The manga goes straight for the type of humour you would expect from a character like Takeo, although it always feels good-natured.

His best friend Makoto acts as a nice counterbalance to Takeo’s headstrong personality, helping to keep him grounded. I like how the manga sidesteps the all-too-common love triangle; Makoto very much encourages the budding relationship between Takeo and Rinko.

Similarly, there are a variety of other supporting characters who are mostly there to support the romance in one way or another. As a result, the story can seem a bit formulaic in parts, but the way the characters are written helps to keep things engaging.

 

Recommended Japanese language level

I consider this manga to be appropriate for JLPT N4 or upper beginner level and above. Most of the dialogue is short, and aside from the way Takeo himself talks, there isn’t too much slang to deal with.

In addition, being a slice of life manga, there isn’t any specialist vocabulary to contend with. Together with the presence of furigana, I think this is a great manga to try and read in Japanese if you are looking to read manga in Japanese for the first time. It also helps that the manga volumes aren’t too long, and I find that once I start reading I can get through the volumes pretty quickly.

As always, you can read a sample of this manga on the EbookJapan website to get a feel for its difficulty by clicking the blue ‘無料立ち読み’ button.

There is an anime adaptation of this manga which is available on Crunchyroll. The live-action film adaptation was released in 2015 and you can find the trailer for it here.

 

If you do try reading any of the recommendations, please let me know how you get on the comments. I am always on the hunt for beginner friendly manga, so if you have any suggestions please let me know!

If you do like this recommendation, you might also like:

Happy Reading!

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Appy Mondays: Beelinguapp Review

Welcome to my series of app reviews relating to Japanese language study. Today’s app review is of the Japanese version of the foreign language audiobook app Beelinguapp.

 

appymondays

 

Beelinguapp is a reading app aimed at helping language learners to improve their reading skills. The apps allows you to read a number of stories available at Beginners, Intermediate and Advanced level. Besides Japanese, Beelinguapp is available for French, Russian, Portuguese, Spanish, German, Chinese, Hindi, Turkish, English, Arabic, Italian and Korean.

 

How Beelingua works

The app is host to a range of stories available for you to study. The selection is mostly fairy tales and well-known children’s stories, although there are also some non-fiction articles on topics including culture and science. Not all articles are available for free, as indicated by the currency signs in the top right corner.

 

 

Click on an individual story to download and add it to your collection. Opening up the story from your collection then brings up the text in two languages of your choice (I was using Japanese-English, but you can choose any two languages from the ones I listed earlier).

The story comes with full audio which can be adjusted for speed to your liking. In the Karaoke Reading mode, the sentence being spoken is highlighted as you go along, making it very easy to follow. You can click on the sentence to hear that specific sentence on its own.

 

 

There are also a number of ways to customise your reading experience:

  • Option to toggle English translation on or off if you wish. You can also set the app so that the target language is in one window, and the English is in the other (known as Side by Side Reading).
  • Ability to adjust text size
  • Change reading screen to Night Mode

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By long pressing a word or phrase, you can choose to add it to your Glossary for viewing later. There isn’t a dictionary in the free version, but you can add your own notes alongside each word (so you could, in theory, look up the words separately and add the furigana readings and English translation yourself).

A handy feature is that you do not need to have the app fully open if you just want to listen to the stories; you can happily use your phone for other things whilst listening to the audio. At the end of each story, there are reading comprehension quizzes in the target language to test your understanding.

Like most apps nowadays, Beelinguapp is a freemium app. The Premium version has no adverts, new texts added weekly and the ability to translate individual words. For these extra benefits, Premium membership costs £13.49 for the year, or £3.09 per month (the first month is often discounted).

 

My thoughts on Beelinguaapp

There are a lot of things to like about Beelinguapp, namely:

  • There is a nice choice of stories/ articles on offer – even for the free version of the app, there is a fair amount of variety.
  • The design of the app is excellent – it is very sleek, colourful and user-friendly
  • Audio quality for Japanese is extremely good
  • Ability to test your understanding at the end of each story with quizzes

You can tell that the app was made with language learners in mind; the app itself is a joy to use.

On the other hand, the main problems for Beelinguapp for me are the difficulty of the texts and the lack of furigana.

I’m not sure how the difficulty levels were decided on as the ‘Beginner’ texts were pretty tricky (at least for Japanese) in terms of vocabulary and grammar. To some extent, this is down to the content of children’s stories not always being everyday language. Having the audio and English translation helps, but with the English translation not being literal, it would be very tricky for beginners to parse sentences.

I think that in order to improve the reading experience for Japanese learners of all levels, the ability to turn furigana on alongside kanji would be necessary. Without furigana, I feel that the learning curve for the content available is just too steep for beginner learners in particular. Japanese learners who are already at an intermediate level might find this app sufficient for practicing their reading, especially if following the tadoku method.

When it comes to Japanese study in particular, Beelinguapp suffers from the same issue as the Drops app I reviewed previously. The same app is available in different languages, but due to the different writing system and word order, this one-size-fits-all model of language learning app doesn’t work for Japanese as well. I suspect Beelinguapp would work better for languages that are more closely related than English and Japanese.

The dictionary being behind a paywall is a frustrating choice, as for me, the benefit of using reading apps like Tangoristo and Mondo is that you can use the app to study without having to have a dictionary with you to look up the words you do not know. Ultimately, if you are looking for an app to practice your Japanese reading, I would recommend these two apps over Beelinguapp (some of Mondo’s articles come with audio too).

As an audiobook app, I think it does work quite well for those who like to practice dictation or shadowing thanks to the clear audio. I do not know of any other audiobook apps that are aimed at language learners, so I do feel that it goes some way to filling a gap in the market.

Overall, the free option is sufficient in variety and features to be a useful app for listening practice – just be prepared to have a dictionary at hand!

If you are interested in checking the app out, it is available in the Apple store and Google Play store.

Have you tried this app out? Are you aware of a better alternative? Let me know in the comments!

Keeping it Simple: tips for simplifying your language study routine

I’ve been experimenting with my study routine recently, and I’ve realised that it has become much easier to stick to my study plan now that I have made some changes. Since focusing on better habit building, I feel like I’ve been making more progress.

Especially with the internet at our fingertips, there are more language resources than ever before; we can instantly download an app or watch a video if we want to start learning a new language.

The problem is really that we have too much choice.

Japanese language resources, in particular, are in abundance online. Combined with the difficulty level of kanji and grammar, learning Japanese can feel overwhelming whether you’ve been studying for 3 days or 3 years.

Here are three of the changes I have made recently that have not only simplified my own routine, but also stopped me from feeling overwhelmed:

 

Evaluate my study space

I don’t actually have a dedicated study space myself – I normally sit on my sofa or bed to study.

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I wish I had a desk like this! 

One thing that has helped me despite not having a desk is having a study notebook or novel near me at all times, whether that be in my work bag or on my bedside table. When I was studying for my school exams, I always used to put my study notes in a place where I couldn’t avoid seeing them, such as near my glasses or house keys.

Just seeing my Japanese notes on a daily basis, especially first thing in the morning, reminds me to fit in some time to study whenever possible.

If you do have your own study space, I suggest having a look at it to see how it can be improved. Only have the items that you really need for your studies (dictionary, textbooks, pens, pencils) and hide anything which could be a distraction. Having a tidy space will make sure that when you do sit down to study, you will be able to fully focus.

Similarly, with online resources, it is a good idea to put the apps or websites you use in a prominent position on your phone or internet browser. If online distractions are a problem for you, there are plenty of helpful apps out there to minimise distractions.

For example, I make sure I have a list of podcasts that I add to on a weekly basis: this ensures I always have something to listen to when I do have some spare time. This leads me nicely on to the next tip…

 

Identify dead time

I’ve written about using your time most effectively in my other post on Getting Your Language 5-a-day. The post mainly deals with splitting up language learning into smaller chunks and identifying ‘dead time’ which can be better spent working on your target language.

Our lives obviously vary from week to week, and so if you haven’t looked at your schedule recently it might be worth taking some time to re-evaluate your dead time.

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It’s important to be realistic about how much time you have to study, so that you can adjust your expectations based on how busy you are.

Don’t think that only having small amounts of time isn’t long enough for studying Japanese – consistency is better than the length of time you study for. By keeping up with that 5-10 minutes daily, you’re going to be making more progress than a longer study session of 1 hour a week.

The benefit of this for me is that I’ve realised that I actually have lots of time in the day to listen to Japanese than I thought. I especially enjoy listening to podcasts while doing housework.

 

Decide on what resources to focus on in advance

If you know exactly what you want to study and how you’re going to do it, you will be able to ensure you maximise your study time and minimise distractions. Studying Japanese (or any language) is better in short sessions, and knowing which resource I am going to use beforehand prevents me from wasting time before I’ve even started studying.

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Not pictured: my haul of Japanese textbooks and resources!

This also gives you the chance to assess what resources work better for you than others. There really are so many resources out there for Japanese, that when a new shiny app or website comes along, it is easy to forget about a tried and tested resource.

That isn’t to say that you shouldn’t try out new resources, especially if it appears to suit your learning style. If something isn’t working for you, it is much easier to identify if you are using it consistently rather than sporadically.

In my case, I am working towards the JLPT again, so my study is more focused on vocabulary and grammar from textbooks (I like the Shin Kanzen master series so I am using their grammar textbook in particular).

 

Tracking habits

I am a big believer in cultivating good habits in order to help achieve your study goals, and for the past few months I’ve been using the Habitica app to track my language learning. On the app, I have a list of Japanese study habits to achieve daily (basically to listen/read/write/speak Japanese), which I can tick off when completed.

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There is a great Japanese learning challenge on Habitica which I recommend if you already use the app!

The biggest change I have noticed since using a habit tracker is that my mindset regarding Japanese study has changed. I do not strictly schedule study sessions at certain times of the day, so I just fit study in when I can.

When I do have a spare 5 minutes, I now think “what can I do in Japanese in 5 minutes” rather than “it’s only 5 minutes, I’ll check Facebook”.

Habit trackers are a really useful way of positively reinforcing new habits – I get so much satisfaction from ticking something off my daily goal list. Even after a long day, the fear of losing my habit streak has pushed me to open up a book or to finish my flashcard reviews.

There are tons of apps out there which allow you to track your habits and/or study time. Alternatively, if you use a bullet journal there are lots of cool ways to visually represent your habit building offline.

 

So this is my list of things that have helped me. Are there any changes you have made to your study schedule that have really helped you? Let me know in the comments!

Japanese Loanwords (gairaigo): 5 things to remember

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Foreign words imported into Japanese (known as 外来語 gairaigo) is an increasingly large part of the Japanese language. Japanese loanwords are easy to spot, as they are written in katakana rather than hiragana or kanji.

The use of loanwords is often touted as a way for learners of Japanese to quickly increase their vocabulary. This is somewhat true and fortunately for beginners, common Japanese words are indeed borrowed from English.

 

Computer コンピュータ (Romaji: konpyuutaa)

Piano ピアノ (Romaji: piano)

Hamburger ハンバーガー (Romaji: hanbaagaa)

 

However, loanwords in katakana are not always what they seem and therefore can cause issues for some learners for a few reasons:

  1. Pronunciation differences
  2. Loanwords are not always from English
  3. Loanwords from English can be false friends
  4. Pseudo-Anglicisms
  5. Abbreviations

Let’s look at each of these in turn.

 

(1) Pronunciation differences

Japanese is a phonetic language, unlike English. This point can cause confusion for Japanese beginners, as items are written in Japanese based on their pronunciation, not their spelling.

For example, the country Cuba is キューバ not クバ.

 

(2) Loanwords are not always from English

English native speakers tend to think of Japanese loanwords as being from English, but this is often not the case.

Portuguese loanwords

パン (pan) bread

イギリス (igirisu) the UK

キリスト(kirisuto) Christ

コップ (koppu) cup

 

Dutch loanwords

コーヒー (koohii) coffee

ランドセル (randoseru) backpack used by Japanese schoolchildren

ゴム (gomu) gum; rubber

コッコ (kokku) cook

 

French loanwords

アンケート (ankeeto) survey, questionnaire

コンクール (konkuuru) competition

ズボン (zubon) trousers

エステ (esute) beauty salon

 

German loanwords

アルバイト (arubaito) part-time job

エネルギー (enerugii) energy

テーマ (teema) theme

カルテ (karute) a patient’s medical records

 

(3) Loanwords from English are often false friends

English loanwords do not always retain their meaning when used in Japanese. Some words take on additional meanings in Japanese, and others have completely different meanings to their English counterparts.

These so-called ‘false friends’ are fairly common, so make sure you check with a friend or refer to a dictionary when you come across new words.

 

Examples of Japanese-English false friends

ペンション (penshon)

The word pension refers to the payments one is entitled to after they retire, but in Japan a pension refers to a type of lodging or inn

 

ホーム (hoomu)

This is a shortened version of プラットフォーム means railway platform

 

カンニング (kanningu)

カンニング in Japanese refers to ‘cheating’ (ie. on a test) and is often used with the verb します.

 

(4) Pseudo Anglicisms/ Wasei-Eigo

Pseudo Anglicisms are words borrowed from English in other languages but do not actually exist in English in the way an English speaker would recognise or use. Japanese has a lot of these, known in Japanese as 和製英語 wasei eigo.

 

サラリーマン (sarariiman)

Literally ‘salary man’, this refers to a male office worker

 

ベビーカー (bebiikaa)

pram, stroller, pushchair

 

チャームポイント (chaamupointo)

‘Charm point’ is used by people when describing an attractive feature about themselves or others.

 

(5) Abbreviations

Abbreviations are pretty common in Japanese. For example, けいたいでんわ (keitai denwa 携帯電話) is the correct word for mobile phone, but it is usually shortened to just けいたい (keitai 携帯).

When some words are imported into Japanese they become quite long and so it makes sense to abbreviate them. Loanwords are often shortened to four syllables, which makes it easier to remember but on the other hand, makes it more difficult to work out what the original word or phrase was.

Japanese

English

Original Japanese word

パソコン PC, personal computer パーソナルコンピューター
コンビニ Convenience store コンビニエンスストア
デパート Department store デパートメントストア

 

So what is the best way to tackle Japanese loanwords?

This post isn’t intended to scare you from learning any loanwords, as they are incredibly useful.

It is best to treat loanwords as Japanese words, even if they sound similar to English. ‘Relearning’ words that are already familiar to you might sound counterintuitive but could save you from embarrassment later on.

Asking a Japanese friend or tutor is a good way to confirm the correct meaning of any word. Failing that, searching Google images (not Google Translate!) comes in really handy for checking whether that new katakana word means what you think it means.

Places to legally watch Japanese dramas online for free

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If you are a fan of Japanese dramas, then you will know that finding places to watch them legally is much more difficult (compared to Korean or Chinese dramas anyway). Netflix is working on expanding its range of Japanese dramas, which is good news for international fans. However if your budget cannot stretch to a Netflix subscription, there are other options out there. Here are three places to get your Japanese drama fix for free (or very cheap)!

Crunchyroll

Crunchyroll has been established for some time as the go-to place to watch the latest anime, and to a lesser extent manga. Crunchyroll has evolved over the years to provide a wide range of Japanese shows in an on-demand format. This includes a pretty good range of Japanese dramas; whether you enjoy suspense dramas or romcoms, you will find something you enjoy here.

crunchyrolljapanesedramas

Crunchyroll (like the others on this list) operates on a ‘freemium’ model, meaning you can watch most of the content in standard definition for free with adverts interspersed in each episode (usually at least 4 ad breaks in a 45-minute drama episode). To get rid of the ads and stream in HD, you need to pay a subscription cost of £4.99/$6.95 per month.

Pros:

  • Can install the Crunchyroll app on a variety of platforms: iOS, Android, pretty much all video game platforms
  • Broad range of dramas to watch

Cons:

  • Annoying adverts (on the Android App, you tend to get 2-3 ads at the same time which are not skippable at all)
  • No options for Japanese subtitles

Being mostly interested in Japanese dramas, I’ve listed the Jdramas you can watch for free (further content is available if you have a subscription).

 

List of Japanese Dramas available on Crunchyroll:

99 Days with the Superstar

Akagi

Always the Two of Us

Angel Heart

Anohana: The Flower We Saw that Day

Antiquarian Bookshop Biblia’s Case Files

A Taste of Honey

Biyou Shounen Celebrity

Crazy for Me

Death Note (live action drama)

Desperate Motherhood

Detective vs Detectives

Dinner

Doctor’s Affairs

Dr Coto’s Clinic

Forget Me Not

Frenemy ~Rumble of the Rat~

Future Diary: Another World

Galileo

Ghostwriter

Gokaku Ganbo

GTO/ Great Teacher Onizuka

GTO: Taiwan Special

Happy Boys

Hard to Say I Love You

Hero (2014)

High School Entrance Exam

I’m Mita, Your Housekeeper

Iryu: Team Medical Dragon

Last Cinderella

Liar Game

Life in Additional Time

Mischievous Kiss – Love in Tokyo

Mischievous Kiss 2 – Love in Tokyo

Mr. Nietzche in the Convenience Store

Mooncake

Nobunaga Concerto

Nodame Cantabile

No Dropping Out ~Back to School at 35~

Onna Nobunaga

Ordinary Miracles

Power Office Girls 2013

Rebound

RH Plus

Shiratori Reiko

Switch Girl

The 101st Proposal

The Perfect Insider

Time Taxi

Ultraman 80

Ultraman Gaia

Ultraman Ginga

Ultraman Leo

Ultraman Max

Ultraman Mebius

Ultraman Nexus

Ultraman Orb

Ultraman X

Wakakozake

Wild Mom

You Taught Me All the Precious Things

 

Viki

Viki is a website that is a subsidiary of Japanese online retail giant Rakuten. The website has a large collection of Korean, Mainland Chinese, and Taiwanese dramas in addition to Japanese dramas. The collection of Japanese dramas is relatively small but there is some variety in terms of genres.

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What I like about the website (and app) is that it is very easy to use. It is easy to filter by Japanese dramas and if you create an account, you can save a list of dramas you want to watch later. You can read drama reviews by other members, and it is possible to turn on live comments showing reactions from other users whilst you watch the drama too which helps foster a sense of community.

For language learners, you usually have the option to switch subtitles in the options between English, Japanese, and many other languages. Viki members help with the translations, which helps make the dramas accessible to many people around the world.

Viki is free to view, but ad-free and higher quality videos require a Viki pass, which has a subscription cost of $4.99 per month.

Pros:

  • Sense of community
  • Japanese subtitles available for a lot of dramas
  • App is very slick and easy to use

Cons:

  • Limited selection of dramas
  • Annoying adverts (slightly better than Crunchyroll in that they are usually skippable)

 

List of Japanese dramas available on Viki:

A Doctors’ Affairs

A Heartfelt Trip to Fukushima [TV show]

All About My Siblings

Blue Fire

Clinic on the Sea

Dear Sister

Delicious Niigata in Japan [TV show]

Dokurogeki

Festival: Pride for Hometown [TV show]

FLASHBACK

Galileo

Girls Night Out [TV show]

GTO in Taiwan

Hakuoki SSL: Sweet School Life

HEAT

Hello! Project Station [TV show]

Hirugao: Love Affairs in the Afternoon

I am Reiko Shiratori!

I am Reiko Shiratori the Movie

Juho 2405

Juho 2405 the Movie

Kakusei

Kimi wa Petto (2017 remake)

Koinaka

Lady Girls

Last Cinderella

Leiji Matsumoto’s OZMA

Let’s Explore Fukushima

Love Stories from Fukuoka

Murakami Grand Festival 2016

My Little Lover

Mysterious Summer

Nogizaka 46 Meets Asia [TV show]

Painless: The Eyes for Signs

Phoenix [Movie]

Railway Story [TV show]

Rainbow Rose

Ramen Loving Girl

Real Horror

Second to Last Love (Season 1 and 2)

Sendai Iroha Zoukangou [TV show]

Switch Girl Season 1

Tabiaruki from Iwate [TV show]

Tales of Tohoku [TV show]

Teddy Go!

The Hours of My Life

The Sanjo Great Kite Battle [TV show]

Torihada

Upcoming! [TV show]

Vampire Heaven

Visiting Sacred Places of the Tohoku Region

 

Drama Fever

This is sort of an honourable mention as due to licensing, none of the Japanese dramas I tried were available to stream in the UK 😦

Like Viki, Drama Fever is mostly focused on Korean and Chinese dramas but does have a small selection of Japanese dramas as well.

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Whilst there is some overlap with Viki/ Netflix, there are a few unique dramas. All dramas have English subtitles, in addition to quite a few other languages.

Watching the dramas is free, but a full subscription allowing additional features such as HD quality, offline viewing and casting to other devices costs $2.99 a month.

It is a shame that I couldn’t get to watch some of the unique content Drama Fever has. I am hoping by including it on this list, people in other countries will be able to make use of this website.

Pros:

  • Website/ app is nice to use
  • Subscription relatively cheap

Cons:

  • Not available in many countries
  • Small selection of dramas

 

List of Japanese dramas available on Drama Fever:

Spring Has Come [Haru ga kita]

Mischevious Kiss Seasons 1 and 2

Last Cinderella

Switch Girls Seasons 1 and 2

The Reason I Can’t Find My Love

Ryomaden

Love Affairs in the Afternoon

The Hours of My Life

Yae’s Sakura

Partners by Blood

Dear Sister

A Clinic on the Sea

Tenchu

The Perfect Insider

 

So that’s my current list of free Netflix alternatives for Japanese dramas. If you are aware of any others then please let me know and I can add them to the list.

The post I wrote on Netflix has some tips on how you can use TV shows in general to study Japanese.

Are you a Jdrama fan or not? What are your favourite dramas or TV shows to watch in Japanese? Let me know in the comments!

Should you learn to write by hand in Japanese?

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We live in an increasingly digital world. As a consequence, the importance of handwriting has diminished – why write a letter when you can send an email? A lot of Japanese learners may think that learning to write Japanese by hand is a waste of time.

Especially with all the apps and other digital materials out there for Japanese study, it is even easier to skip learning handwritten Japanese and to stick to typing kana and kanji instead.

The major argument for avoiding writing Japanese is often that Japanese people don’t remember how to write kanji any more. There is certainly evidence to suggest this is a growing trend.

So, in the light of all this, is learning to handwrite Japanese worth it for Japanese learners?

When it comes to studying Japanese, I believe that learning to write by hand is a good skill to have, although in a lot of situations handwriting is no longer necessary in Japan.

How important it is for you as a Japanese learner to practice handwriting will depend on two questions.

The first question to ask yourself is: ‘What is your language goal?’

If this includes living in Japan at some point, being able to handwrite the basics is a minimum requirement. Particularly in rural areas, you will be required to write certain things such as your address by hand when completing essential tasks such as setting up a bank account.

Similarly, if you want to become a student in Japan you could get asked to write rather than type your assignments. Needless to say, attending a language school in Japan will involve writing your homework by hand.

The second question to ask yourself is: ‘How do you study best?’

I am always writing things down as a way of remembering things. For me, this also applies to language learning: I personally find it much easier to memorise new vocabulary/ kanji when I write them out by hand.

There is some evidence to suggest that in general, writing is a more effective way to study compared to typing.

Ultimately you are the person who has the deepest understanding of how you learn best. If you don’t have to write things down in order to remember them, then using handwriting as a study method is likely to be a futile exercise.

A couple of caveats…

Technology is a great thing, but you shouldn’t be entirely reliant on it. Making sure you recognise how things should look in written Japanese will avoid any potential for embarrassment.

I would recommend learning the stroke order of radicals – having a basic knowledge of the building blocks of kanji means you’ll be able to write neatly should you find yourself in a situation where you absolutely must handwrite Japanese.

In addition, whether you decide to learn to write by hand in Japanese or not, there are differences between handwritten and typed fonts for both kana and kanji, so make sure that you as a Japanese learner are aware of these.

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Note: TheJapanGirl’s post on this topic has some great infographics and is definitely worth checking out!

I am interested to hear other people’s opinions on this. Do you think that handwriting is a necessity in today’s age, whether that be in Japanese or any other language?

 

Image source: http://la-lievre.seesaa.net/article/165005808.html 

Manga Recommendation: ダーリンは外国人 / My Darling is a Foreigner

Today’s manga recommendation post for Japanese learners actually contains pictures from one of the physical volumes of the manga (thanks to eBay!). I normally buy my manga digitally but do own some physical volumes, which I might cover in another post someday.

Quick facts

Author: Saori Oguri

Genre: Slice of life

No. of volumes: 6

Recommended for: JLPT N3

Furigana: Yes (mostly)

Anime/ drama/ film adaptations?: Yes, a live action film.

Note: There is also a volume of the manga in English

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Plot overview and my thoughts on the manga

This manga is about the author (who is a manga artist) and her husband, Tony. Tony is an American who came to Japan in the 1980s and is a bit of a language geek. The manga centers on their daily life and relationship, usually from Saori’s perspective. In some ways, Saori and Tony are very different to each other, and not just because of the language difference. Later volumes of the manga focus on how the couple adapts to having a baby and moving to Germany.

I was initially a bit apprehensive about reading this manga, as I thought that perhaps the manga would fall into the common trope of ‘a foreigner struggling to adapt to or understand Japanese culture’. However this is not the case – there is no dumbing down to explain things to Tony as he is fluent in the language (the target audience is Japanese after all). The general tone of the manga is lighthearted and whilst it does mention their cultural differences, it is never done in a way which implies a certain way of thinking is more superior than the other.

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As you will see from the photos, the art style is not typical of most popular manga. I think that this only adds to the charm of the manga. Both Saori and Tony as central characters are interesting to read about, as they have their own quirks and it is their interactions which make normal situations quite humorous. The manga reminds me of the Korean webtoon “Penguin loves Mev” which is also about the daily life of a Korean/British international couple.

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Language level

In terms of language level, I would put this at JLPT N3. There’s quite a lot of slang as it is mostly dialogue – having said that, the language used is usually everyday level. Whilst there is furigana, the manga has a mix of printed Japanese and handwritten Japanese (the handwritten Japanese parts usually reflect Saori’s thoughts as opposed to what she says out loud). The handwritten parts do not come with furigana and therefore may be trickier to understand.

There is also a live-action film starring Mao Inoue as Saori. I’m not really a fan of the film, having watched it sometime before I actually read the manga it was based on – I didn’t feel like the film was able to convey the couple’s personalities enough. You should be able to find the film on YouTube if you do wish to check it out.

As always, you can read a sample of the manga on the EbookJapan website.

Happy Reading!

If you do try reading any of the recommendations, please let me know how you get on the comments.